© all rights reserved.


Just click on the pictures to enlarge.

Friday, November 02, 2018

New forks........once the seed of doubt has been sown!!!!!!!!.


This fork changing project came about whilst on a club ride, when they were discussing the pros and cons of carbon forks.  I had read articles about carbon forks having a "shelf life" and then the discussion turned to riders changing them every two or three years and the durability of steel forks.  So  once the seed of doubt was sown I decided to thoroughly check mine out, as they have been on the bike for over three years.
I dropped them out of the bike and checked them over with a torch looking for hairline cracks especially around the steering tube.  The only fault I could find was where the mudguard had rubbed a groove into the left hand fork, but this was mainly paint rubbed off, but there was a groove.
 Hence the seed of doubt........... I temporarily remedy this by cutting away a section from the mudguard under the fork crown.
So after a couple of weeks of thinking about it I decided to change them for steel ones. and ordered  some replacement steel forks from Genesis. The forks are the same as fitted to the current models. 




The first job is to fit the crown race ring.  There are specialist tools for this but You tube always comes up with an alternative and this was  to use a bottom bracket spanner and a chisel with a heavily padded head to tap  and seat the race correctly. 


The bottom bracket spanner and a hammer to tap it down 




and the padded chisel to makes sure its fully seated.



Tapping gently evenly around the edge ensures that the race isn't damaged.




The next job is to cut the steerer tube to the required length.  I used a 30mm pipe cutter.

Always measure twice and cut once,  and allow space for the star nut to fit inside the cut tube to give a firm fixing on the handlebar stem.


Offcut.



As I'm older and dont want a racing position when riding, I prefer a longer steering tube for the handlebar stem, so plenty of spacers.



All finished, and the most fiddly bit is getting the mudguard stays even.



Was it worth it,  can I tell the difference?.  They steel forks are heavier, but then it was never a particularly light bike in the first place.  I've ridden it a few miles and its as comfortable as it always has been and the steering and feel from the road seems much the same.  

But probably the main difference is that now the seed of doubt has gone..

11 comments:

  1. Good job and especially improvising on the tools. I know what you mean about the doubt..once I had a set of tires that I grew doubtful about and it just wouldn't do till I replaced all of them! When I did the tire garage said "these tires are still in good shape"...oh well.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Sondra, peace of mind is priceless. I hope you're well and that every thing is getting back on track. I read yesterday that a Grey Catbird has been spotted in Cornwall, blown in by the westerlies I expect, thats still 3500 miles from the US a long way. All the best.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well done. Getting it comfortable and stable brings security.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very true Mr A, and so important for enjoyment.

      Delete
  4. In 70 years of cycling I have never owned a bike with carbon forks. If you don't race is the weight saving worth the uncertainty? (As I now need to ride an ebike which has sprung front forks I guess it is a choice that will not worry me)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I bought the frame it came with carbon forks and it was the flexibility in them that I wanted, but I haven't noticed any difference with the new forks.

      Delete
  5. Nice work! It's always good when you find a work around rather than having to spend a fortune on some special tool you'll rarely use.
    I'm the same regarding carbon fibre - I've read too many instances of failures to have full confidence in it, as I'm a worrier and those seeds of doubt would weigh heavy on my mind. None of my bikes have any CF in them, and I'm happy to keep it that way, not being a weight weenie or anything.
    When it comes to forks though, there's no room for failure, along with the front wheel, you really do not want anything going wrong at all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree Mick and the bike weight has never been an issue with me either. I think you're better off loosing a few pounds yourself rather than spending money on lightweight components. In in all I'm much happier with the steel forks.

      Delete
  6. How about an original Bates frame, with his "biflex" front fork?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very interesting I've not heard of or come across these before. I would imagine they were very comfortable to ride long distances as presumably there was plenty of give in them.

      Delete
  7. I am IMPRESSED with your mechanical skills. It would never occur to me to even attempt the fork work. That's a cool bike. When I was in college I rode a Brooks saddle and I could never get it to stop hurting me. To be fair, I've never owned a saddle that was totally comfortable, it's sort of a what is the least worst that can be used.

    ReplyDelete

As you have taken the time to read my blog and comment then whenever possible I will always reply. Thank you. Dave